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July 12, 2021
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7
 min read

Does CBD oil need to be refrigerated and what is the best way to store it?

does cbd oil need to be refrigerated
 Anthony Clement
Written by  
Anthony Clement
on 
July 12, 2021

table of Contents

Given that CBD products come in a liquid form, it makes sense that they would have a shelf life. Besides, you should always think about the loss of potency as something that might occur due to improper storage.

CBD oil (not to be mistaken for hemp seed oil, which is used as cooking oil) is really easy to store. Remember that different cannabis infused products have different shelf lives, so you might need a different approach for each one.

We will answer the question does CBD oil needs to be refrigerated, and we will also touch on some other items from this category.

Should you put CBD oil in a fridge?

You don’t have to refrigerate a CBD tincture, although refrigeration may provide a longer shelf life. Depending on the hemp CBD product that you're using, some of them might be more suitable for a fridge. This might also depend on other ingredients within the bottle or packaging. Anyway, you probably don't risk anything by storing cannabidiol in such a way.

Experts often debate on whether you should place CBD oil in a fridge. Generally speaking, the substance should be kept at room temperature. But, as we mentioned, a fridge might prolong its shelf life. Besides ingredients, hemp plant strain may play a role. Most cannabis companies provide refrigeration instructions on the packaging, which should give some clarity to the user.

CBD oil can last for up to 2 years if it's in an airtight container and protected from sunlight. According to some cannabis specialists, you can put it in a fridge as it gets close to the expiration date. That way, you might be able to increase its life expectancy a bit more.

What happens when you put CBD oil in a freezer?

Another option is to put the substance in a freezer. Generally speaking, the cooler your hemp CBD oil, the longer it will last. Natural cannabis oil will not necessarily become toxic. Instead, it will lose most of its potency after a certain period of time.

If you have a big batch of cannabidiol products, you might want to consider placing them in a freezer. Most CBD oil products will be used within a month if you use them regularly. So, if you're buying CBD tinctures one by one, you won't have to think about this.

Needless to say, it will take a bit for oil to thaw once you get it out of the freezer.

How to store CBD oil?

Not only should you think about storing natural cannabinoids, but other ingredients as well.

Oftentimes, companies use base oil for their tinctures. Carrier oils, such as olive oil and MCT oil (derived from coconut oil), are also used for cannabidiol products. These carrier liquids may have different properties complicating the whole process. Even with that, you can rest assured that your CBD oil will last somewhere between 1 year to 2 years.

Like with lots of other products, you need to have an airtight container. Humidity and moisture are simply disastrous for this substance, and you should avoid them at all costs. Furthermore, this airtight bottle should be a bit darker to prevent sunlight from penetrating.

Whether it's marijuana or hemp, CBD isolate, or full spectrum, these products don't react well to light and extreme heat. It is best to place them in a pantry, where you can control room temperature. They need consistent conditions, and even if there is some humidity in this room, the bottle should provide an additional safeguard.

Certain medicinal hemp products are more prone to the elements such as CBD edibles. Nowadays, a lot of people make CBD baked goods such as CBD butter. Like every butter, this one needs to be kept in a fridge, not a storage room.

How do elements affect CBD oil?

If you wish to store CBD properly, you need to avoid things such as light, heat, and humidity. Each one of these can severely affect a product’s shelf life. And while it is easy to store CBD at home, it becomes harder if you carry the bottle outside. For example, leaving a CBD topical in a car or a purse can totally ruin it.

The climate can especially be troublesome. Besides that, you should also keep your CBD oil away from home appliances that produce heat. Needless to say, Sun is also a major issue. Ideally, you should place cannabidiol in one spot and only remove it for consumption.

Humidity and moisture are something you need to be aware of. They affect the substance by creating mold turning a product rancid. This will have an impact not only on CBD oil but also on underlying essential oils. In case of extreme humidity, rancid cannabidiol tincture can have a very negative impact on your health.

Which items should be placed in a fridge?

Method of storing will vary significantly based on the substance. While all of them react poorly to the elements, some of them may require refrigeration, while others don’t.

Oil

Cannabidiol oils are pretty straightforward. Most of them can be kept in a pantry, but depending on ingredients, you might need a refrigerator as well.

The best way to know is to check the essential oils. Some of them may require special conditions and refrigeration. You can always read the label to learn more about your CBD extract. Generally speaking, there shouldn't be an issue if you keep the oil under 70 Fahrenheit.

Topicals

Whether we’re talking about CBD creams, balms, or other infused products, most of them need extra care. Topicals are more sensitive than oil, especially to temperature and air. And while you might keep your cannabidiol oil in a storage room, you shouldn’t do the same with topicals.

Vapes

Vape cartridges are one of the easiest CBD products to store. Regardless of their ingredients, they are already placed in a container meant to protect them from the elements. You can argue something similar for CBD oil, but it seems that vapes are even better in that regard.

Whether they rely on CBD or not, these items don’t need refrigeration. In fact, they are tailor made for carrying around. Cannabidiol vapes can last for up to 2 years unless you expose them to extreme heat. Keep in mind that vapes can also benefit from a fridge even though they don't necessarily need it.

Edibles

This is the trickiest category on the list. You can easily store manufactured products such as CBD gummies in a fridge. Unfortunately, the problem occurs if you bake some goods at home. CBD infused foods are great, but you need to be very careful when handling them. In this particular case, you don't have to consider the shelf life of CBD, but instead, the freshness of underlying food.

How to determine if CBD oil has gone bad?

Again, this will depend on the product. You will notice if an edible has become moldy, but things are a bit different with CBD oil.

You can determine if medical hemp oil has gone bad based on its smell, taste, and color. First of all, the tincture will become cloudy. It might start stinking, and its thickness might increase.

CBD shouldn't be toxic even past its expiration date. The problem occurs if one of the other ingredients has turned rancid. Anyway, while a product turning bad is not that big of an issue, it will affect its potency. No matter what, we suggest that you throw it away and buy a new bottle.

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Online: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7071207/ 

Larsen, C., Shahinas, J., (2020), Dosage, Efficacy and Safety of Cannabidiol Administration in Adults: A Systematic Review of Human Trials, Journal of Clinical Medicine Research

Online: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7092763/ 

Zamengo, L., Bettin, C.,  Badocco, D., Di Marco, V., Miolo, G., Frison, G., (2019), The role of time and storage conditions on the composition of hashish and marijuana samples: A four-year study, Forensic Science International

Online: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30901710/

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